sometimes i think, & sometimes i don't.
wolves-whales-and-waves:

4gifs:

Hockey player makes kid’s day. [video]

Hockey players are seriously the best. They move the fastest, hit the hardest, and play the longest, yet they still have the humility to interact with fans & make their day. Hockey players don’t get nearly enough credit. I think they’re probably THE best athletes I know.

wolves-whales-and-waves:

4gifs:

Hockey player makes kid’s day. [video]

Hockey players are seriously the best.
They move the fastest, hit the hardest, and play the longest, yet they still have the humility to interact with fans & make their day.
Hockey players don’t get nearly enough credit. I think they’re probably THE best athletes I know.

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via dentaldam)

Notes
21783
Posted
1 hour ago

Pablo Neruda , 100 Love Sonnets  (via thatkindofwoman)

My favorite poem. Ever.

(via puta-del-infierno)

(Source: sebarnes, via dentaldam)

I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where. I love you simply, without problems or pride: I love you in this way because I do not know any other way of loving but this, in which there is no I or you, so intimate that your hand upon my chest is my hand, so intimate that when I fall asleep your eyes close.
Notes
3072
Posted
1 hour ago

nosdrinker:

everyone who likes coconut water is lying

(via acivilmuffin)

Notes
34502
Posted
2 hours ago

babyferaligator:

sighprincess:

What are some cool sex positions

standing at the ATM handin me all ur money

(Source: zvyozdochka, via xkiharux)

Notes
80748
Posted
2 hours ago

halinacrown:

Hannibal Art Meme

The (Renaissance) Still Life
During the Renaissance, artists turned to the classical world, its literature, architecture, and art, for inspiration, and it provided the figural ideal emulated in painting in sculpture of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. It also provided, though to a lesser extent, early precedents for still-life painting. These could be found in trompe l’oeil murals and illusionistic tile work depicting fruits, flowers, eating vessels, bones, and skulls. Nevertheless, still-life painting in the Renaissance was consigned by art historians such as Giorgio Vasari to the lowest limbs of the hierarchy of the arts, as its execution was believed to rely less on divinely appointed genius than upon observation, science, and craftsmanship: an artisanal rather than artistic talent. By the end of the sixteenth century, several artists had challenged this convention, and a new generation of painters brought a greater naturalism, and with it an elevated esteem, to the genre. (x) (x) (x) (x)

(via pagingagentgraham)

Notes
314
Posted
2 hours ago

revolutionary-core:

earthlyeyes:

Porn Sex vs Real Sex: The Differences Explained With Food

Every guy should just really look at this.

This video made me laugh so much and is important

(Source: feyminism, via radicalanarchy)

Notes
129985
Posted
2 hours ago

mysticjc:

Arthur Rackham

"Arthur Rackham is widely regarded as one of the leading illustrators from the ‘Golden Age’ of British book illustration which encompassed the years from 1900 until the start of the First World War."

(via radicalanarchy)

Notes
17083
Posted
2 hours ago
fatbodypolitics:

For those who are unaware, Joumana Kayrouz is a badass. 

Just a few days older than 50, Joumana Kayrouz may offer one of the most compelling portraits of the American Dream that southeast Michigan has to offer. In the midst of the 30-year Lebanese civil war, she arrived in the United States with $1,000 in her pocket, half a college education and limited English language skills. Since then, she has built the second-largest personal injury law firm in Michigan, employing about 70 people, including a large team of lawyers. It’s the only major personal injury law firm in Michigan owned by a woman, and wields an advertising budget of approximately $4.3 million dollars a year. She holds a degree in ethics from Yale University, speaks four languages — English, Arabic, French and Italian, and is flawless in all but the last — and metro Detroiters can see her face on more than 750 billboards and buses, the wallpaper of the city. 
She is probably also the most visible Arab-American in southeast Michigan — an area of the world with one of the largest Arab populations outside the Middle East. She’s been a trailblazer in her profession, one traditionally dominated by white Jewish men, and to many who know her, she’s a quiet feminist icon. She serves as a cultural ambassador between Lebanon and the United States, and is an enormous donor to progressive politicians, especially those who advocate for the rights of women. She gives approximately 20 percent of her wealth to charity, tithing in accordance to her profoundly felt religion, and serves as a role model to many in the legal profession and the immigrant and Arab-American communities in Detroit.

fatbodypolitics:

For those who are unaware, Joumana Kayrouz is a badass. 

Just a few days older than 50, Joumana Kayrouz may offer one of the most compelling portraits of the American Dream that southeast Michigan has to offer. In the midst of the 30-year Lebanese civil war, she arrived in the United States with $1,000 in her pocket, half a college education and limited English language skills. Since then, she has built the second-largest personal injury law firm in Michigan, employing about 70 people, including a large team of lawyers. It’s the only major personal injury law firm in Michigan owned by a woman, and wields an advertising budget of approximately $4.3 million dollars a year. She holds a degree in ethics from Yale University, speaks four languages — English, Arabic, French and Italian, and is flawless in all but the last — and metro Detroiters can see her face on more than 750 billboards and buses, the wallpaper of the city. 

She is probably also the most visible Arab-American in southeast Michigan — an area of the world with one of the largest Arab populations outside the Middle East. She’s been a trailblazer in her profession, one traditionally dominated by white Jewish men, and to many who know her, she’s a quiet feminist icon. She serves as a cultural ambassador between Lebanon and the United States, and is an enormous donor to progressive politicians, especially those who advocate for the rights of women. She gives approximately 20 percent of her wealth to charity, tithing in accordance to her profoundly felt religion, and serves as a role model to many in the legal profession and the immigrant and Arab-American communities in Detroit.

(via radicalanarchy)

Notes
228
Posted
2 hours ago